100 Drabbles of Summer – 69. Picture of return to Sender on envelope

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For the first time in years, James had a letter.  He even suspected that he knew who it was from.  Once the war had finally drawn to a close, he’d mailed one to Aunt Edith, whom he hadn’t spoken to since he’d started living with her son at age sixteen. 

Mostly, he’d inquired after her well-being, since he didn’t remember much of her life at large.  When he removed the envelope from the mailbox, he was startled to find ‘return to Sender’ stamped on the front in large letters.  He never found out whether she survived the war or not.

James Knox.  Original character.

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